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Google Doodle celebrates Veterans Day 2022 with a 3D Sculpture of the American Flag

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Google Doodle celebrates Veterans Day 2022 with a 3D Sculpture of the American Flag

Google Doodle celebrates Veterans Day 2022 with a 3D Sculpture of the American Flag on November 11, 2022. Friday is Veterans Day in the US, a day reserved for Americans to pause to honor and give thanks to the people who have served in the US military defending our country.

Google Doodle on Veterans Day 2022

Google traditionally turns the focus of its Google Doodle every Nov. 11 to honor the contributions of those brave men and women, and the current year’s Google Doodle draws on recognizable themes, with Google lettering portrayed in military disguise intertwined in a 3D paper sculpture of the American flag.

Today’s Google Doodle, made by Diné (Navajo Nation member) and Marine Corps veteran Monty Little, celebrates US Veterans Day. Anchored by a 3D paper sculpture of the American flag, the art highlights Google letters in military disguise woven all through, representing how essential our veterans are to the fabric of our country.

30 Amazing Facts about Veterans Day

Initially known as Armistice Day, which denoted the finish of hostilities in World War I, Veterans Day is observed each Nov. 11. The name of the holiday was officially changed to Veterans Day in 1954, however many actually observe a moment of silence on Nov. 11 at the 11th hour – – the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, when the cessation of hostilities officially finished in World War I.

In 1919, the US government established this day to praise the people who served in World War I and called it Armistice Day. After World War II, soldiers supported for Armistice Day to praise all veterans. President Dwight D. Eisenhower officially changed the name of the holiday in 1954.

Like past tributes Google has dedicated to Veterans Day, the vivid pictures in the current year’s Google Doodle were made by a guest artist who served in the US military. Friday’s Doodle was made by Monty Little, a member of the Navajo Nation and Marine Corps veteran from Tuba City, Arizona. Little said he was lowered when he was approached to team up on the Doodle.

Today, communities across the country hold luncheons, military demonstrations, and educational events to honor the efforts and sacrifices of all past and present members of the US military.

Many individuals observe a moment of silence at 11 a.m., which denotes the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month — precisely when World War I finished. Numerous veterans and their friends and family spend the day visiting monuments in Washington D.C. or attending official ceremonies at the Veteran Association’s National Cemetery.

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