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National Grammar Day 2020: History and Importance of Grammar Day

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National Grammar Day is seen over the United States every year on March 4th. The recognition supports the use of the right grammar in both verbal and written language.

As indicated by the Global Language Monitor, the assessed number of words in the English language is 1,025,109. There is some contention over that figure, however, it’s protected to state it is over a million.

Language is something to celebrate. A few people may propose that grammar is a set of rules for language, yet it is a system for understanding language. Understanding the system and the structure helps us to understand each other better and can assist us with learning new languages.

National Grammar Day History

Assigned in 2008, the National Grammar Day was established by Martha Brockenbrough, author of “Things That Make Us [Sic]” in 2008 and founder of the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar.

Martha Brockenbrough had enough. She had seen the word mishandled and demeaned and essentially wouldn’t represent another case of the poor innocent language being dealt with inadequately in her presence. Not on her watch! So it was that Martha decided that every single great verb, adverbs, nouns, and adjectives words merited a day when individuals went to bat for their rights and would not permit them to be abused. No more would apostrophes be lost, forgotten, or misplaced. No more would we discover commas left out and proper nouns in lower case; those days were previously, and in this manner, she wrote “Things that makes us [sic]” to help spread the word about poor grammar.

Grammar is a crucial part of communication, as the inclusion or exclusion of certain grammatical elements can change the significance of a sentence. What do you do when you see signs marked with a “Harsh Brown Potato” breakfast? Or on the other hand grocer signs that declare that you can get your “Glutten Free” foods here? What about the time KEYE TV in Texas announced the “Department of Criminal Justice: What they’re doing to fix it”? Extremely, regardless of where you go or what you do for a living, grammatical errors are an issue that we as a whole should know about.

How to celebrate National Grammar Day 2020?

Straight forward and simple, all you need to do to celebrate National Grammar Day is require some additional effort in making your sentences grammatically right.

Catch up on your exercises from elementary school and double-check your sentences to guarantee that the message you intend to send is in truth the message you’re sending. Those you’re speaking with will appreciate it, and those of us who grind our teeth whenever we see grammar inappropriately used will have one less reason to see the dentist.

There’re so many ways to celebrate the day. Try these on for size:

Read a new blog, book, magazine or newspaper. You may learn a new turn of phrase or word.

Learn a new word from another language. Not all languages use the same grammar rules. A few languages even have words that don’t exist in different languages.

Spend time with somebody who communicates in your first language as a second language. You may gain some new useful knowledge about syntax, tense or spelling.

What may be a grammar error in one language is consummately fine in another. Do you communicate in two languages or more? What are the special differences between grammar rules that decides that you’ve taken note?

Give a valiant effort to utilize appropriate grammar and use #NationalGrammarDay to post via web-based networking media.

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Matthew Gregor decided that he wanted to become a writer at the age of 16, when his high school football team won a big game. He wrote a poem about this, and two days later the poem was published in the local newspaper. When he began his professional writing career, Matthew attempted to write books. Matthew’s writing direction changed and he writes news and articles. He is now onboard with Time Bulletin as a free lance writer.