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Google Doodle Celebrates Summer and Winter Solstice 2020 and The Great Conjunction at Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere

Google Doodle observed Winter Solstice, Summer Solstice, and The Great Conjunction with an animated graphic on December 21, 2020. The Great Conjunction, a visual overlap of Saturn and Jupiter in the night sky, is an uncommon phenomenon that the world will observe today.

Google Doodle for Celebrating Summer 2020, Winter 2020, and The Great Conjunction! at Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere

celebrating winter 2020 and the great conjunction northern hemisphere 6753651837108654.5 2xa
Celebrating Winter 2020 and The Great Conjunction! (Northern Hemisphere)
celebrating summer 2020 and the great conjunction southern hemisphere 6753651837108655 2xa
Celebrating Summer 2020 and The Great Conjunction! (Southern Hemisphere)

The present animated Google Doodle is in celebration of the winter solstice and The Great Conjunction. The graphic “celebrates the Northern Hemisphere’s first day of winter as well as this rare double planet sighting-or Great Conjunction-which can be viewed from anywhere around the globe,” Google Doodle said on its page.

As a team with NASA, Google on Monday celebrated the first day of winter in the Northern Hemisphere and the uncommon combination of Jupiter and Saturn with an animated doodle. In the doodle, the Great Conjunction is displayed as cartoon Saturn and Jupiter getting together for a quick high five, and the winter solstice as the literally “snow-capped” Earth viewing the other two planets.

Google Doodle notices Winter Solstice today – the shortest day and the longest night of the year – a phenomenon that happens when one of the Earth’s poles has its greatest tilt away from the Sun.

“Solstice” started from the Latin solstitium signifying “sun stands still”. In the Northern Hemisphere, Winter Solstice happens between December 19 and 23. This year it is on December 21.

After Winter Solstice, days begin becoming longer and nights shorter for individuals in the Northern Hemisphere. The opposite phenomena happen for individuals in the Southern Hemisphere.

The current year’s Winter Solstice matches with another special astronomical event – the “Great Conjunction” of Jupiter and Saturn.

On Monday evening, Jupiter and Saturn will be in an uncommon planetary alignment, showing up nearer together in the evening sky in almost 800 years. They won’t show up this nearby until 2080.

The animated Google Doodle shows Great Conjunction, wherein Saturn and Jupiter get together for a speedy high five, and the Winter Solstice as the literally “snow-capped” Earth viewing the other two planets.

The event “Great Conjunction” of Jupiter and Saturn is likewise being referred to as the “Christmas Star of 2020.”

December 21 denotes the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the longest night of 2020.

This year, December 21 denotes the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, and on this longest night of 2020, an incredible, astronomic event known as the “great conjunction” will be on the display. The great conjunction is a visual overlap of Saturn and Jupiter, our solar system’s two biggest planets, in the night sky.

What is the Great Conjunction?

The Great Conjunction is an uncommon astronomic event that will happen this evening. Saturn and Jupiter, the two biggest planets in our solar system, will almost overlap to form a “double planet,” an event that hasn’t been noticeable since the Middle Ages-right around 800 years back.

The Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn will be the nearest since 1623 – 13 years after Galileo constructed his first telescope and found four new ‘stars’ orbiting Jupiter.

NASA expresses that “the two planets will appear just a tenth of a degree apart”. This celestial event won’t occur again in the next 60 years, that is, until 2080.

During the Great Conjunction, the two planets in our solar system will appear to nearly converge in Earth’s night sky, to such an extent that they’ll show up as a splendidly brilliant ‘double planet’. Throughout the next two weeks, the two planets will inch nearer to one another until they’re just a 10th of a degree separated in the night sky, which is generally a similar thickness as a coin, as indicated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA).

Stargazers state that conjunctions between the two biggest planets in our solar system aren’t especially uncommon. Jupiter passes its neighbor Saturn in their respective laps around the sun every 20 years. In any case, the present celestial event is particularly close: Jupiter and Saturn will be only one-10th of a degree separated from our point of view or around one-fifth the width of a full moon. What’s more, if the weather allows, the planets should be effectively noticeable around the globe a short while after sunset.

The planets will next come similarly close on March 15, 2080. On the evening of December 21, their physical distance will be around 735 million km, Director of MP Birla Planetarium, Debi Prasad Duari, said in a statement.

How to see the Great Conjunction?

On its page, Google Doodle depicted the process as it stated, “Find a spot with an unobstructed view of the sky, such as a field or park. An hour after sunset, Jupiter will look like a bright star and be easily visible in the southwestern sky. Saturn will be slightly fainter and will appear slightly above and to the left of Jupiter until December 21, when Jupiter will overtake it and they will reverse positions in the sky. Feel free to use binoculars, but the planets can still be seen with the unaided eye.”

The last time such a December conjunction occurred return in 1226 and the planets won’t be this nearby again until March 15, 2080. The “Great Conjunction” of Jupiter and Saturn is likewise being referred to as the “Christmas Star of 2020.”

Then, after Winter Solstice, days begin becoming longer and nights more limited for individuals in the Northern Hemisphere.

All the more explicitly, Saturn and Jupiter will be within .1 levels of one another. While the great conjunction happens generally every 20 years, the last time the event was as effectively visible in the sky as it will be for this winter solstice was almost 800 years prior.

To check the two events, Google has teamed up with NASA to create an animated Doodle portraying the great conjunction as cartoon Saturn and Jupiter getting together for a fast high five, and the winter solstice as the literally “snow-capped” Earth viewing the other two planets.

Google and NASA have given a few hints on how best to see this spectacular great conjunction around evening time

  • Discover a spot with an unobstructed perspective on the sky, for example, a field or park.
  • An hour after nightfall, Jupiter will resemble a bright star and be effectively visible in the southwestern sky.
  • Saturn will be somewhat fainter and will show up marginally above and to one side of Jupiter until December 21, when Jupiter will surpass it and they will turn around positions in the sky.
  • Don’t hesitate to use binoculars, yet the planets can still be seen with the unaided eye.
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