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St. David’s Day 2022: Google Doodle denotes the national celebration of the Welsh patron Saint as Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant

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Out of appreciation for St. David’s Day, referred to in Welsh as Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant, the present Google Doodle is inspired by symbols of Welsh heritage and its antiquated cultural legacy.

Google’s notable logo gets the annual St David’s Day makeover today denoting the national celebration of the Welsh patron Saint.

The present Google Doodle is the most recent in a long queue of designs celebrating St. David’s Day on the search engine’s website dating back to 2004.

Out of appreciation for St. David’s Day, referred to in Welsh as Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant, the present Doodle is roused by images of Welsh legacy and its antiquated social heritage.

Way back in the fifth century, a Celtic king named Vortigern found his thought process was the ideal place to build his palace on the Welsh hillside.

In any case, Myrddin Emrys (Merlin, the wizard) persuaded Vortigen that there was a catch—a large fire-breathing one! The spot he had picked was directly above the lair of two slumbering dragons; one red, one white.

Upon the palace’s construction, the two dragons were found in a fierce fight.

The red dragon emerged arose successfully and got back to rest in his subterranean lair, permitting Vortigen to finish the building of his fortress once the dust had settled.

The red dragon has since become an immortal symbol of the Welsh people and St. David’s Day, alongside the daffodil which features on the Doodle artwork.

Albeit the story of Dinas Emrys might seem as though only dream, a 1945 excavation of the site observed stays of a fortress dating back to Vortigern’s time.

In the legend of Dinas Emrys, a Celtic king begins a fight between fearsome dragons—one white and one red. The red dragon was triumphant and presently remains as the symbol centered on the national flag. Different symbols of this day are the leek and the daffodil which some Cymry (Welsh people) wear to celebrate the day.

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