Time Bulletin

Lifestyle and Sports News

romy schneider 82nd birthday
Lifestyle

Romy Schneider: Google Doodle celebrates German-French actress’ 82nd birthday

Spread the love

Google praises the 82nd birthday of German-French actress Romy Schneider with a beautiful Doodle on September 23, 2020.

Who was Romy Schneider?

German French actress Romy Schneider
Romy Schneider

Born as Rosemarie Magdalena Albach on 23 September 1938 in Vienna, Austria into a family of actors that incorporated her Austrian dad Wolf Albach-Retty, her German mother, Magda Schneider, and her paternal grandmother Rosa Albach-Retty. Romy Schneider was a legendary star of European cinema between the 1950s and the mid-’80s.

A month after Romy’s birth, the parents moved to Germany. Romy Schneider grew up with their grandparents in Germany. Schneider was registered in the elementary school of Schönau in September 1944 and went to from July 1949 to the girls’ residential school at Castle Goldenstein, a private secondary school of the Augustinian Canonesses of the Congregation of Notre Dame in Elsbethen close to Salzburg. On July 12, 1953, she left the residential school Goldenstein with the degree of Mittlere Reife.

Romy Schneider’s first film, made when she was 15, was When the White Lilacs Bloom Again in 1953, credited as Romy Schneider-Albach. In 1954, Schneider, for the first time, depicted a royal, playing a youthful Queen Victoria in the Austrian film Mädchenjahre einer Königin (known in the U.S. as The Story of Vickie, and in Britain as Victoria in Dover).

Romy Schneider’s breakthrough accompanied her depiction of Empress Elisabeth of Austria, in the romantic biopic Sissi in 1955 and its two sequels, Sissi – The Young Empress in 1956, and Sissi – Fateful Years of an Empress in 1957, all with Karlheinz Böhm, who became a close friend.

It was during the filming of Christine that Schneider fell in love with French actor Alain Delon, who co-featured in the film. She left Germany to go along with him in Paris, and they declared their engagement in 1959.

Romy Schneider decided to live and to work in France, gradually picking up the interest of movie directors, for example, Orson Welles for The Trial (1962), in light of Franz Kafka’s The Trial. A short stretch in Hollywood remembered a featuring role in Good Neighbor Sam (1964), a comedy with Jack Lemmon, while What’s New Pussycat? (1965), albeit American-financed was shot in and around Paris.

Romy Schneider kept on working in France during the 1970s, most notably with director Claude Sautet on five movies. On 30 October 1974, Schneider made one of the most memorable moments on German TV.

Over the next decades, Romy Schneider worked with some of the world’s top directors and redefined herself as a productive power in international cinema.

For her performance in “L’important C’est D’Aimer” (“That Most Important Thing: Love,” 1975), Schneider became the very first recipient of the César Award for Best Actress–one of the French film’s most esteemed prizes–and she won the honor again for 1978’s “Une Histoire Simple” (“A Simple Story”).

Romy Schneider died on 29 May 1982 at 43 years old in Paris, France.

Romy Schneider accumulated international recognition for her charismatic and provocative performances in excess of 60 feature films all through her celebrated career. The French journalist Eugène Moineau started in 1984 the Prix Romy Schneider, the most renowned award for upcoming actresses in the French film industry. In 1990, the Austrian newspaper Kurier made the Romy TV Award out of appreciation for Schneider. Until 2002, the Austrian Federal Railways InterCity service IC 535 from Wien Südbahnhof to Graz was named “Romy Schneider”.

On September 23, 2020, Google celebrated Romy Schneider’s 82nd Birthday with a Google Doodle.

LEAVE A RESPONSE

Dan Zinman started his career as an astronomer and college professor and quickly expanded into popularizing the understanding of science and scientific discovery. He did this through writing books, essays, and articles. He is contributing by writing news articles for timebulletin.com.